Posts tagged small business
Leaving social media (and 60,000 followers) in order to grow — with Nick Fancher

“For years I viewed social media as a necessary evil. I continued to push myself to try and make social media work, to have no enemies, to love everyone I interacted with. In the end, it proved to be an impossible task.

NICK FANCHER, Editorial, Portrait, and Commercial Photographer  

Nick Fancher is a photographer, author, and educator who specializes in dramatic lighting, often employing the use of bold colors and experimental camera techniques. His work ranges from portrait and commercial photography to fine art. He is particularly known for his efficient method of working, which is with the use of minimal gear, often in unconventional locations.

— from nickfancher.com

We know Nick. We’re familiar with his work. And as captivating as it is, we were drawn like a moth to light regarding a very different story unfolding with him. Earlier this year, he made the decision to do what some might see as unthinkable — especially from a “grow your business” standpoint. He quit social media.

  • Why does an entrepreneur with more than 60,000 followers delete his social media accounts?

  • How can an entrepreneur, whose work is tailor-made for platforms such as Instagram, decide to quit feeding the beast?

  • Even if it’s a necessary evil, the key word is still “necessary” — right?

As we pose these questions to Nick he reveals both the practical and personal reasons for walking away from social media at the height of his online visibility. Whether you think it’s a deft move or one that will prove detrimental can be debated. But for Nick that’s not really the point. Instead he reached a breaking point. Now he is literally taking control of his work and his life the only way he knows how.

Nick Fancher’s website

Ghosted — Nick’s announcement to leave social media

Advantages of going small & going home — with Katie & Josh Emrich
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“I feel I've found this calling working with small businesses and I don't feel like I have to make excuses for not having these big clients. I've worked with big companies and I've just found it to be a soul-swallowing process because they are so risk adverse, so many people have to sign off on the work, and you're so far removed from the decision-makers.”

JOSH EMRICH, Emrich Office

 

“Design becomes other things. It's not just on a computer or on a piece of paper. It's how you see the world.”

KATIE EMRICH, Emrich Office

 

 

 

Emrich Office is perhaps best summarized as the artistic vision of Josh and Katie Emrich that is made full with their four kids and one rather spectacular basement studio in Indianapolis. It's also a long way from Colorado and the design mountains Josh was trying to scale just a handful of years ago. But as Josh explains, summits can look awfully good from the ground, but from the summit, base camp has a genuine appeal, too.

Josh and Katie share their journey of slogging through a recession-era climate in attempt to go big,  and keep the gears cranking. What they ultimately found was a greater reward in embracing the appeal of small — both with regard to their business size and those of family-owned businesses that comprise their client list.   

We learn that behind a great designer is... another great designer. And that's what makes this duo work so well in running a successful design business and designing a deliberate way of life for their not-so-small family.

Insight, wisdom and lessons learned abound in this third installment of our "Indy or Bust" series featuring Indiana-based creatives. 

Life at the seams of product innovation & personal purpose — with Daniel McKewen
 

“I remember my wife saying to me, ‘if you don't do this, if you don’t see it through, you're going to wonder what would've happened — and it's going to drive you crazy.’ And that was the absolute truth.”

DANIEL McKEWEN, founder,
Seagull Bags & Singing Needle Studio

 

At first glance, Daniel isn’t likely to be pegged as a guy who spends his day sewing or cutting fabric. Yet when presented with a need for a better messenger bag, Daniel picked up his grandmother’s sewing machine and went to work. What started as out as a personal project while in art school was suddenly turning into into a word-of-mouth business with international clients before he graduated. With growth of more than 300 percent for the first five years, his epic rise also came with epic challenges — leading to a need to pause and reassess everything. But as the calloused fingers of any true craftsman will tell you, giving up just wasn't an option.

Hear Daniel’s story and how he’s kick-starting a second chapter for a beloved brand and is embarking on a crowdsourcing project to solve a problem for musicians like himself.

www.seagullbags.com
www.singingneedlestudio.com