Posts tagged creativity
Leaving social media (and 60,000 followers) in order to grow — with Nick Fancher

“For years I viewed social media as a necessary evil. I continued to push myself to try and make social media work, to have no enemies, to love everyone I interacted with. In the end, it proved to be an impossible task.

NICK FANCHER, Editorial, Portrait, and Commercial Photographer  

Nick Fancher is a photographer, author, and educator who specializes in dramatic lighting, often employing the use of bold colors and experimental camera techniques. His work ranges from portrait and commercial photography to fine art. He is particularly known for his efficient method of working, which is with the use of minimal gear, often in unconventional locations.

— from nickfancher.com

We know Nick. We’re familiar with his work. And as captivating as it is, we were drawn like a moth to light regarding a very different story unfolding with him. Earlier this year, he made the decision to do what some might see as unthinkable — especially from a “grow your business” standpoint. He quit social media.

  • Why does an entrepreneur with more than 60,000 followers delete his social media accounts?

  • How can an entrepreneur, whose work is tailor-made for platforms such as Instagram, decide to quit feeding the beast?

  • Even if it’s a necessary evil, the key word is still “necessary” — right?

As we pose these questions to Nick he reveals both the practical and personal reasons for walking away from social media at the height of his online visibility. Whether you think it’s a deft move or one that will prove detrimental can be debated. But for Nick that’s not really the point. Instead he reached a breaking point. Now he is literally taking control of his work and his life the only way he knows how.

Nick Fancher’s website

Ghosted — Nick’s announcement to leave social media

JOMO: the joy of missing out

“When you turn stuff off and you are forced to engage with people and do things, you discover REAL likes and dislikes — not thumbs up or thumbs down, not opinions — but the actual enjoyment of doing.”

— Thad & Jeremy, JOY VENTURE

 

Missing out? Who wants to miss out?

Perhaps the better questions to ask are:

  • What are you missing out on by being fully distracted, seduced by the ding and siren song bell of an incoming text, tweet, IM or post?

  • What does it mean to live in the present, the here and now without incessantly scrolling through the carefully curated lives of your infinite followers — many of whom you must admit we have no personal relationship with?

We grapple with this addictive digital discourse that we all face, contemplate the example we’re providing for those around us, the need for guardrails, and how the concept of boredom and white space is virtually nonexistent — just look around at everyone with their heads buried in their devices.

FOMO is a byproduct of the digital times we live in. But if we’re intentional, we can get back the precious time we hand over to social apps and push notifications that keep us from true social engagement and/or downtime to fuel our curiosity and creativity.

If FOMO is a real thing for you (we can attest that we’re guilty of succumbing to it from time to time), then it’s time to change this narrative and embrace JOMO — and spread that kind of joy instead of auto-feeding the fear.

Why the world needs your weirdness — with CJ Casciotta

“I was waiting for it (the big idea) to go away. A year went by and it didn’t go away. I sat on it for two years, which is not my nature… and when I found the name, I knew things were lining up and it was time to act.”

CJ Casciotta, Author of GET WEIRD and Lead Misfit of RINGBELLER

Have you ever felt like you were the weird one who just didn’t fit in with the crowd? If so CJ has an important message for you: weird wins.

CJ is a writer and author, creator, filmmaker, mover and shaker, and all around disrupter — and he’s doing all this with one goal in mind — and that’s to help misfits like you and me embrace our weirdness. Because in a sea of same, those of us who think a bit differently are needed more than ever before.

CJ recounts the long journey he’s been on, why he’s written a book to help others get weird, and where all this weirdness is leading. For CJ, it’s back to the classroom where the idea of fitting in has misguided generations of people. By building a media-based curriculum for schools that is rooted creativity, empathy and kindness — the soft skills that leading companies say will be needed in the automated workforce of the future — he wants to redefine what it means to be sweetly, uniquely and powerfully weird.

CJ Casciotta

Ringbeller

Adopting new ways to live & work — with Ben & Beth Stafford
 

“There's much to be said about investing more in people than your business; and one may directly influence the other.”

BEN STAFFORD, Foxmeadow Creative

“It's something really important to us that we prioritize, family time and work time, and that's helped us keep our sanity. We don't work all hours of the night and day, we want to make sure we have time to spend as a family outside of work.”

BETH STAFFORD, Foxmeadow Creative

 

A move. A pivot. A layoff.  And a whole lot of pursuit into the unknown.

For many of us, this kind of change, disruption and lack of clarity can be unnerving. For Ben and Beth, they are choosing to see an alternative plan for how best to approach work and the art of living a purposeful life.  

Becoming familiar with their story, one could easily be reminded of the lyrics to Divine Intervention, the opening track to Matthew Sweet's classic 1991 album, Girlfriend.

I don't know where
I'm gonna live
Don't know if I'll find a place
I'd have to think about it some
And that I do not wish to face
I guess that I'm counting on his
Divine intervention.

Hopeful, heartbreaking, funny, honest and real— these are perhaps the best ways in which to illustrate a conversation with two big-hearted creatives that are pursuing a path less traveled with no regrets. 

Foxmeadow Creative

Ben Illustrated (illustration website)

Ben Stafford: How to Become an Expert (Making Midwest Fest)

Losing that spark and finding it again — with Mark Henson

“I felt like every conversation with a mentor on another business person came back to ‘I don’t know what I want to be when I grow up’ and I didn’t like that because I knew for the longest time — this is it. I love what I do and want to do it forever... and then I didn’t. And that was weird.”

MARK HENSON, Founder of sparkspace & author of Ordinary Super Powers

Anyone who knows Mark would likely agree that he’s one of the more upbeat and positive people you’ll ever meet — and as the founder and creative force behind sparkspace, he’s running one of the coolest places on the planet for creative inspiration, personal development and team building. 

And that’s all Mark wanted to do. Run a business just like that.

Until he didn’t. 

Mark opens up about what happens when you lose that spark for the thing you love, how depression can still get its grips on the optimist, and how figuring out what you’re good at — and not simply passionate about — is the key to unleashing your ordinary super powers. This is a story of rediscovery and finding that spark again to do your best work — that stuff you were meant to do.

We also discover some interesting back history on Mark as he reveals tidbits about his life as as Top 40 radio disc jockey in middle America, with a not-so-middle-America on-air persona.    

sparkspace

Ordinary Super Powers