Posts tagged discovery
Absolutes and contradictions
not here2.jpg

There’s been quite a bit of commentary regarding a recent Stanford study that proclaims "following your passion" is lousy advice. It reminded me of a premise for a blog post I was considering a few years ago after mentoring a number of entrepreneurs looking to launch their next great idea:

 

Don’t let passion overshadow common sense.”

 

This sounds like reasonable advice, which is why I wrote it down on a note card that perches above my workspace along with dozens of other thoughts and ideas. Here are a few others I’ve jotted down:

 

Reputation is your ROI.

Be generous with your time.

The empty narcissism of awards shows. (credit to Jeff Goodby for this idea)

 

There is a level of absolutism in all of these, a stated right way and an implied wrong way. As a writer and strategist, I can defend these premises. When I do, I’ll likely hold onto them as some form of truth, something close to absolute. I find that worrisome.

I’m careful to write about these things – and numerous others – even when I believe the premise is good (can we agree that being generous with your time might be a good thing?). My journalistic background tells me to be objective, recognize that there are two sides to every story and the truth is somewhere in between.

Instead, like those poetry refrigerator magnets, I flip premises and rearrange the thoughts to reveal something different:

 

Don’t let your passion, your common sense or your ROI overshadow your generosity.

Reputation can be narcissistic.

Generosity is your awards show.

 

I find there's as much truth in these ideas, too, even though it’s not where my mind initially went.    

 

What if passion is allowed to overshadow common sense? Not indefinitely, but briefly and occasionally? What if that seemingly absurd risk (lack of common sense) results in something spectacular? Then what?

 

We’re not inherently wrong to acknowledge things we've long held as truths. Attempting to contradict them also can do us well. It’s where growth and possibility and wonder make their cameos outside of the well-intended plan.

Recently Jeremy and I interviewed Jeff Frane for the Joy Venture podcast. Jeff’s love has always been bicycles – with a dream to design the kind of bikes he and his friends would love to ride. It’s a dream at age 6 that sounds quaint, something that parents would say – go for it! But in your mid-20s with an unrelated college degree and its requisite debt, being broke, living out of a van, and working a warehouse job at a bicycle parts shop, common sense says something entirely different: Abandon your passion. Grow up. Get a real job.

Jeff said something that contradicted that wisdom when we asked what his parents and family thought of his career trajectory. It went like this:

The truth is I had a job. I was working and contributing to society. That’s all that really mattered to them – and to me.” 

We do a lot of projecting of our absolutes on others in an effort to be right. When their contraction of our absolute view proves us wrong, too often we try to explain away the so-called anomaly instead of being inspired.

Absolutes lean toward conformity with unquestionably neat and tidy answers. For the would-be entrepreneur, nothing kills a joy venture faster than immovable absolutes.

On the other hand contradictions are somewhat rebellious; messy with peaks and valleys. People who are actively discovering, developing and desiring to spread their joy know their venture is going to require them to improvise and go with their gut at some point. There’s no clear roadmap. They know it’s not about the plan, it’s about the pursuit.

Test your absolutes. Be open to asking “But what if...?” once in a while. Contrary to conventional wisdom, you might be absolutely surprised what comes of it. 

 

Above image: Micah Lexier: Here, Not Here (Red, Detail), 2017 // Courtesy Birch Contemporary // Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

A year of risk, reward & discovery
The #cbus studio for Joy Venture

The #cbus studio for Joy Venture

One year ago Jeremy and I took a risk to do something new (following a whole bunch of conversation and hand-wringing to get it right). But when we whittled it down to its components, it's hard to believe this was really a risk at all. Here's what we did:   

  • Developed a vision and roadmap for what Joy Venture should or could be
  • Bought some recording equipment
  • Made a list of people whose stories fit our vision
  • Built a website
  • Launched a podcast
  • Wrote a handful of blog posts with the intent to encourage

Our intent all along has been a simple one: to share stories of dreamers and doers who are actively discovering, developing and spreading their joy with the world.

Why this vision

We knew from experience -- and saw it in others -- that we all get stuck: stuck in jobs we don't love. Stuck doing work that doesn't motivate or fulfill us. Just plain stuck in a myriad of ways. What we wanted to do was give a platform for those who found ways to become unstuck -- to take risk and pursue their joy, to pursue that thing that, at some point, might not have been part of "the plan." In doing so, we believed listeners would resonate with the challenges and be inspired by the perseverance of our guests to pursue that thing they felt an itching to do. 

We've said this often: you get one shot on this merry-go-round of life. Make it count. 

What we discovered

The stories being shared are resonating and making a difference. We're finding a loyal and interested audience, even if it doesn't always show up in the almighty marketing metrics. How do you measure the impact on the heart or to quantify success when someone takes life-changing action? You listen. And you've told us that sharing a different kind of story that peels back the veneer of the marketing story and the so-called overnight success story is something worth fostering.

Something else we've discovered: It doesn’t particularly matter if you know the podcast guest. If it is someone who is well known, it's because we seek to uncover a story you haven't heard yet. But we're also big on introducing new voices with great insights and compelling stories to share. Discovery is always the key ingredient regardless of who the storyteller is. 

We've wanted the stories told on Joy Venture to be unvarnished, vulnerable, enlightening and encouraging. We'll keep asking: does this inspire or jolt you to think differently about your work or what you feel called to do? Can you see hints of yourself in stories of others? 

This was and still is our hope.

For all of you who have validated that vision for us – thank you. 

What's next

Our growing community of dreamers and doers will multiply this year and spread beyond our home base in Columbus, Ohio. We'll be taking our gear on the road in the months ahead to meet up with extraordinary folks in other states. We'll be dialing in disrupters and community-makers from Indianapolis, Minneapolis and perhaps more cities ending in -apolis; “the other Columbus” down in Georgia; Nashville and even the coasts.

We believe every story we share is unique and valuable. As our episode list continues to grow we'll also help you find the specific types of stories you're looking for by categorizing them by vocation and purpose on our website. Look for that soon.

And we have more up our sleeve – ways in which we'll invite you into to our joy in the months ahead.

Until then, take this as encouragement and a call to action: we discovered and befriended some amazing people with extraordinary stories on this journey. Because we we're willing to take that leap, we're now developing Joy Venture in ways we couldn't have envisioned a year ago. That's exciting for us, and hopefully it will prove valuable to you.

And so it begs these questions:What's that thing you need to do this year? What leap will you take?

If you feel compelled, share what's up your sleeve with us on Facebook or Twitter and be an encouragement to others who have similar ideas or simply need a nudge.  

Joy Venture is a rewarding labor of love meant for all of us – to help us push through the artificial boundaries that we've constructed. Thanks for joining us on this ride. We've got a lot more ground to cover together...